KAMPALA PRINCIPLE 4:CSOs_SUBP 4.A

KAMPALA PRINCIPLE 4 - TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Civil society organisations

Sub-principle 4.A

Measure results

 

Why is it important?

 

International CSOs

Local CSOs

Transparency and accountability in private sector engagement (PSE) need to be improved to help to identify comparable data, lessons learnt and best practices and create confidence and help understand key factors that lead to scale and impact. To know if PSE is working, results need to be measured, though this is not without its challenges, potentially leading to a detrimental burden for local actors. The partnership needs to agree on a measurement framework to use, how the data will be collected, the roles and responsibilities of each partner for collecting data, and how the results will be compiled and shared publicly. However, results and data documentation can marginalise many, especially women and youth organisations, and lessen accountability if these become too heavy, bulky or are not streamlined. It is important to take time to develop results and indicators that can be embraced by all. Measuring results will help the partnership show what works, what does not, any unintended consequences or negative impacts and adjust accordingly. It also builds trust among the partners, identifying challenges to be addressed during project implementation. For international CSOs working as PSE project implementers, providing examples of lessons learnt and experiences from other projects will benefit the partnership’s measurement framework development. Measuring results helps tell partners and the community what is working, what is not and what needs to be adapted. Measuring and communicating results will contribute to more resources, more confidence and better development outcomes. However, results and data documentation can marginalise many and lessen accountability if they become too heavy, bulky and are not streamlined. Partners need to agree on a common measurement framework, how the data will be collected, the roles and responsibilities of each partner for collecting data, and how the results will be compiled and shared publicly. Domestic CSOs have a critical role to play in ensuring that the framework will collect the right data, provide a realistic overview of what is feasible for local stakeholders, call out when the process becomes too burdensome and be an integral part in collecting data. 
 

Colour code:

Yellow = implementation role

Orange = watchdog role

Black = implementation and watchdog role

Self-reflection questions
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International CSOs

Local CSOs

  • Do the countries where you operate have an overarching results framework for PSE projects in their national strategies? If so, did you actively participate in its creation? 
  • Does the framework include indicators that are linked to national priorities and the Sustainable Development Goals? Does this framework disaggregate indicators at impact, outcome and output levels?
  • Does the partnership take into account the national systems and results frameworks of partner countries rather than creating entirely new metrics? 
  • Were metrics to measure business outcomes incorporated into the framework in addition to development results? 
  • Have you been assigned responsibilities for data collection and evaluation according to capacity? 
  • Has a complaints mechanism been set up regarding the role and impact of private sector activities in country? 
  • Can you take advantage of data that you already collect to adapt to the monitoring process?
  • Does your country have an overarching results framework for PSE projects in its national strategies? If so, did you actively participate in its creation?
  • Does the partnership take into account the national systems and results frameworks of the country rather than creating entirely new metrics?
  • Are the data and information readily available and easily accessible? If not, is there a process to follow to file a complaint? 
  • Have you been involved in building the theory of change and identifying the project’s key milestones and hypothesis that is the basis for any monitoring framework? 
  • Do you understand your role and responsibilities in implementing the project’s monitoring framework? Do you understand the project partners’ roles and responsibilities? Have you allocated enough resources (financial, time) to ensure proper quantitative and qualitative monitoring and evaluation? If you do not have the capacity or resources, have you explained this to the partnership? 
  • Do you know where to go to find support for implementing this work? Can you take advantage of data that you already collect to adapt to the monitoring process?

Actions to consider
Discover Tool

International CSOs

Local CSOs

  • Inform local partners of grievance mechanisms that could be utilised. Support the use of grievance mechanisms by domestic CSOs when relevant.
  • Support the development of monitoring frameworks at project and policy level, ensuring that roles are clearly defined, time is taken to build trust between partners, community actors are fully involved and information is easily accessible.
  • Support the capacity development of smaller stakeholders, especially women and youth organisations, to take part in the collection and analysis of information and to be able to raise concerns of overly burdensome data collection. 
  • Support local stakeholders in finding funding to support these activities. 
  • Support data collection when relevant and monitor the progress of the project. 
  • Be clear and open when the reporting burden is too much and seek to rebalance responsibilities with other partners. 
  • Encourage data collection to include disaggregated data, when relevant by gender, disabilities and vulnerable groups.
  • When relevant, utilise the complaint mechanisms and ensure other stakeholders and local stakeholders know to use it.
  • Request funding and resources to ensure you can meet your role and responsibilities in the monitoring framework.
  • Don’t hesitate to acknowledge challenges in collecting and processing data and ask for support when needed. 

 

Pitfalls to avoid
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International CSOs Local CSOs

      DON’T…

  • Settle for the lowest common denominator in the development of project measurement frameworks.
  • Disregard the tension between the need for streamlining indicators and the need for including different stakeholders’ goals and logics. Seek an appropriate balance but recognise there are no blueprints.

      DON’T…

  • Miss to communicate with partners on the capacities available to collect data from end users and when data are not available. 
  • Disregard the tension between the need for streamlining indicators and the need for including different stakeholders’ goals and logics. Seek an appropriate balance but recognise there are no blueprints.
  • Stereotype private sector actors as providers of finance or services alone, thereby overlooking the potential contributions they can make to results measurement. 
  • Fail to engage when the government reaches out to develop the overarching framework.

COUNTRY-LEVEL EXAMPLES

Help us build our knowledge base! If you have any good examples, please share them with the GPEDC Joint Support Team via info@effectivecooperation.org 

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